Looking for a breadwinner

Added: Cathrine Pelton - Date: 13.04.2022 12:03 - Views: 12446 - Clicks: 3085

Traditional gender roles are stubbornly refusing to shift when it comes to the family breadwinner, a long-term survey has found, with men enjoying substantially higher pay than female providers while doing less work around the house. The latest Housing Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey HILDA shows that dual-income couples have risen ificantly sincehowever the of households where a woman earns a majority of the income has barely changed. Samantha White with her month old baby Imogen. Credit: Joe Armao.

Looking for a breadwinner

Women earned more than men in a quarter of households inup from 22 per cent inaccording to the survey, which tracks the same group of 17, people in households over the course of their lives. The analysis of opposite-sex couples paints a picture of family life which is still heavily rooted in the conventional labour split, with women staying at home to look after children while men go to work.

HILDA lead author Professor Roger Wilkins said the concept of the high-earning woman choosing to work while the man stays at home to look after the family was still uncommon. Unlike men, being the chief breadwinner as a woman did not mean the other partner took on most of the domestic labour. Men performed an average of five hours less housework and eight hours less child care in households where women were the primary earner. Female breadwinners in households with children did the most unpaid weekly work of any group: Male breadwinners, in comparison, did Illustration: Matt Golding Credit:.

Looking for a breadwinner

Her husband, Steve, is a carpenter and dropped down to working three days per week when their first child, Imogen, was born 10 months ago. Providing for her family is a source of pride, but Ms White says the role also comes with Looking for a breadwinner lot of pressure, and a little resentment.

In terms of household work, the couple cook together each night but when it comes to cleaning, Ms White said she still does 90 per cent of the work. Men tend to push that to the back of their minds and carry on with whatever is more interesting to them directly. The young family have just bought their first home in Warburton, trading off proximity to the city in an effort to crack into the housing market. Ms White said she was lucky to have flexibility in her employment, which allowed her to work from an office at her nearby parents' house.

That allowed her to save on commuting time and childcare costs, which, according to the HILDA survey, have both risen dramatically since the survey began. Women breadwinners still doing most of the housework: survey. Please try again later.

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Looking for a breadwinner

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Looking for a breadwinner

Tom Cowie is a senior journalist at The Sunday Age. You can contact him at tom. Charlotte Grieve is a reporter for The Age. Connect via Twitter or .

Looking for a breadwinner

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